Archive for April 2015

Where is Brian McNulty and the law office where he works from?

 

Yesterday my firm, Comprehensive Debt Solutions Inc., launched a concerted effort to locate the whereabouts of collection lawyer Brian McNulty and his law office where he collects accounts on behalf of Rogers Communications. Our firm is in possession of a collection letter dated March 10, 2015, that Mr. McNulty sent to a Canadian consumer who allegedly owes money to Rogers Communications.

In this short Youtube video I explain what I find disturbing about a recent collection letter dated March 10, 2015, sent out by collection lawyer Brian McNulty to someone allegedly owing monies to Rogers Communications.

 

Our search for collection lawyer Brian McNulty takes us to 36 Charles Street, Unit 2, in downtown Milton, Ontario, Mr. McNulty’s office address on file with the Law Society of Upper Canada. You can learn more about what our investigation uncovers in Milton, Ontario, in this second Youtube video.

 

Specially trained tracking dogs join the search for Brian McNulty

 

 

Specially trained dogs capable of following a scent over great distances have been broght in to assist in our search locating collection lawyer Brian McNulty the collection practices employed by Rogers Communications and it s third party collection agencies, including Credit Bureau of Canada Collections.

Specially trained dogs capable of following a scent over great distances have been broght in to assist in our search locating collection lawyer Brian McNulty, the collection practices employed by Rogers Communications and its third party collection agencies, including Credit Bureau of Canada Collections.Photo courtesy of Emilie van Gent

 

 

 

In our third and final Youtube video I explain why we have brought in specially trained tracking dogs capable of tracking scents over hundreds of miles to join our search for collection lawyer Brian McNulty.

 

Appeal to the public for assistance finding collection lawyer Brian McNulty

In the past 24 hours I have made a public appeal for assistance locating the whereabouts of collection lawyer Brian McNulty who does collection work on behalf of Rogers Communications.

 

I have asked the public for its assistance locating collection lawyer Brian McNulty, and the signage for his law office.

I have asked the public for its assistance locating collection lawyer Brian McNulty, and the signage for his law office.  Photo courtesy of Emilie van Gent

 

Any member of the public with information about collection lawyer Brian McNulty’s whereabouts, his relationship with his collection agency-client, Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, Mr. McNulty’s law office, or the signage for his law office, is invited to contact Mark Silverthorn at (866) 996-9941  or  (519) 827-5513, or via e-mail at mark@comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca.

 

Additional background information

You can obtain additional background information regarding this unfolding story by reading my earlier blog post on the Mark Silverthorn Blog dated April 21, 2015, titled “Rogers Communications unleashes collection lawyer on unsuspecting debtors” or by visiting my firm’s website, www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit counselling the runt of the litter compared to other debt resolution options

 

Today you cannot turn on the radio without hearing an ad for Consolidated Credit or some other credit counselling agency.  Each year hundreds of thousands of Canadians choose to eliminate their debt via credit counselling–just one of a number of debt resolution options available to Canadian consumers struggling with unsecured consumer debt.

What these radio ads fail to mention is that credit counselling, except in very limited circumstances, does not compare well with other debt relief options.

Credit counselling is the runt of the litter compared to other debt resolution options.  A consumer choosing to eliminate their debt by way of credit counselling is choosing one of the most expensive methods of resolving their outstanding debt. The cost to the consumer using credit counselling to eliminate one dollar of their debt will be somewhere between 110 cents and 130 cents on the dollar–an exorbitant amount!

In the remainder of this blog post I will explain my rationale for this statement–one which the credit counselling industry doesn’t want Canadians to know about.

 

Except in two limited circumstances eliminating unsecured consumer debt by way of credit counselling is not attractive compared to other debt relief options.

Except in two limited circumstances eliminating unsecured consumer debt by way of credit counselling is not attractive compared to other debt relief options.

 

It is difficult to find a more expensive method of resolving your outstanding unsecred consumer debt than credit counselling

If you were to choose credit counselling to eliminate your unsecured consumer debt then the cost of eliminating one dollar of your debt will be somewhere between 110 cents and 130 cents on the dollar.  If you choose credit counselling then you will enroll in a Debt Management Plan (DMP)  which has three separate cost centres:

You will repay 100 percent of your outstanding balance:   Individuals who enroll in a Debt Management Plan with a credit counselling agency will pay 100 percent of their outstanding debt in connection with their unsecured consumer debts.

You will typically pay an additional 10 percent in fees to your DMP provider:

Virtually all organizations that offer Debt Management Plans (DMPs) charge a consumer enrolling in a DMP a fee.  This fee typically adds an additional ten percent to the consumer’s cost for eliminating their debt by enrolling in a Debt Management Plan.

You might have to pay some interest on your outstanding balance during the life of your DMP Credit counselling agencies inform consumers that they will “work with your creditors” to obtain interest relief.  However, a credit counselling agency cannot guarantee you interest relief on your outstanding balance during the life of your Debt Management Plan.  Firstly, some creditors–small creditors, finance companies, and payday loan firms– refuse to provide interest relief to consumers enrolling in a Debt Management Plan with a credit counselling agency.  Secondly, some creditors who would normally offer interest relief to consumers enrolling in a Debt Management Plan might refuse to do so in certain instances if they felt that a consumer had sufficient assets–typically some equity in their house–which could be used to resolve their oustanding account.  Finally, creditors are much stingier offering interest relief to for-profit credit counselling agencies than non-profit credit counselling agencies.

 

How does the cost of resolving your debt situation by way of credit counselling compare with other debt resolution options?

1.    Taking advantage of the expiry of a limitation period

Each province in Canada has a limitation period for unsecured consumer debt, two years in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and New Brunswick, three years in Quebec, and six years in the remainder of Canada.  If you have an unsecured consumer debt, such as a credit card–and your creditor does not commence a lawsuit against you before the expiry of the limitation period in your province then you will be in a position to resolve your outstanding account without paying a single penny to your creditor!

If you communicate with a credit counselling agency do not expect them to provide you with any information as to how you might be able to avoid paying a penny to one or more of your creditors by taking advantage of a limitation period!

 

2.   Eliminating your debt by way of a consumer proposal

If you owe more than $10,000 in debt then you might be eligible to eliminate your outstanding debt by making a consumer proposal through a bankruptcty trustee.  Under a consumer proposal creditors typically repay an amount equal to approximately 35 percent of their indebtedness to creditors–including unsecured consumer debt and monies owing to the government–by making installment payments over a period not to exceed 60 months.  This means that those eliminating their debt by way of a consumer proposal are paying aboout 35 cents to eliminate one dollar of their debt–an amount three times less expensive than credit counselling.

 

3.   Settling your account by negotiationg a one-time lump sum settlement

If you have an unsecured consumer debt and you have not made a payment in more than six months then you might find youself in a position that your creditor will agree to accept a one-time lump sum payment–for an amount significantly less than the current outstanding balance–as settlement in full.  When I negotiated settlements on behalf of consumers four years ago one credit company would routinely accept settlements based on a lump sum payment equal to 18 percent to 25 percent of the outstanding balance.  As a general rule, creditors will not entertain settlement negotations unless an unsecured consumer debt has been unpaid for a minimum of six months.  There are three key factor in determining how generous a particular creditor might be (1) a creditor’s attitude towards settlements, (2) the degree of financial hardship the debtor is experiencing, and (3) the age of the debt–typically the older the debt, the more generous a creditor might be prepared to be.

 

4.   Eliminating your debt by providing your creditor with a series of post-dated cheques

Some, but not all, major banks and credit card companies effectively stop charging interest on an outstanding account once the account becomes six months overdue.  If you have an unsecured consumer debt and your creditor stops charging interest on your outstanding account then it would it would actually be cheaper to provide your creditor, or its authorized collection agent with, a series of post-dated cheques totalling one hundred percent of your outstanding balance, instead of enrolling in a Debt Management Plan.  Under a Debt Management Plan a consumer typically pays a feel to the credit counselling agency, an amount which typically adds an additional ten percent to the consumer’s cost for eliminating his debt.under a Debt Management Plan with a credit counselling agency. In this scenario, if you were to simply provide your creditor, or its authorized collection agent, with a series of post-dated cheques totalling hundred percent of your outstanding balance then you would shave ten percent off the cost of eliminating your debt, compared with credit counselling.

 

5.    Eliminating your debt if you have access to a low-interest loan

If you are able to borrow money at less than 10 percent interest–and the lower the rate of interest the better– then you might actually be better off obtaining a low-interest loan, paying off your creditors, and then paying off your loan, than doing credit counselling.  Some parents might be willing to lend money to their children at four percent interest–more interest than they would receive if on deposit in a chequing account, so that their children could pay off their existing unsecured creditors.

For more information about credit counselling I would invite you to visit the webpage on www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca titled “What Every Canadian Should Know About Credit Counselling”.

Rogers Communications unleashes collection lawyer on unsuspecting debtors

 

Rogers Communications, one of the largest companies in Canada, has a lawyer, whose office is located in a house, collecting its unpaid accounts.  Furthermore, nowhere on a recent collection letter from Brian McNulty, Barrister & Solicitor, sent on behalf of Rogers Communications, can one find the address for Brian McNulty’s law office in Milton, Ontario.

Collection lawyer Brian McNulty owes the public an explanation as to why his collection letter dated March 10, 2015, sent to a consumer allegedly owing monies to Rogers Communications not only fails to contain the address for his law office on file with the Law Society of Upper Canada but also why the footer on his collection letter contains the address for his client, Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, one of the largest collection agencies operating in Canada.

Each lawyer practising law in Ontario provides the Law Society of Upper Canada, the self-governing body responsble for regulatiing the conduct of lawyers in Ontario, with the lawyer’s address.  It is possible to confirm a lawyer’s address by going on the website for the Law Society of Upper Canada, www.lsuc.on.ca,  and searching for a lawyer on the website’s Lawyer and Paralegal Directory.  I recently did a search on the Law Society’s Lawyer and Paralegal Directory for Brian McNulty for which there was one listing under that name.  Here is a screenshot for this listing for lawyer Brian McNulty.

The Lawyer and Paralegal Directory found on the website for the Law Society of Upper Canada lists 36 Charles Street, Unit 2, Milton, Ontario as the address for lawyer Brian McNulty.

The Lawyer and Paralegal Directory found on the website for the Law Society of Upper Canada lists 36 Charles Street, Unit 2, Milton, Ontario as the address for lawyer Brian McNulty.

 

I recently came into possession of a redacted copy of a collection letter from lawyer Brian McNulty, dated March 10, 2015, sent to a consumer who allegedly owed monies to Rogers Communications.  This redacted copy of this collection letter is  reproduced below.

 

Nowhere on this collection letter from lawyer Brian McNulty can you find his office address at 36 Charles Street, Unit 2, in Milton, Ontario.

Nowhere on this collection letter from lawyer Brian McNulty can you find his office address at 36 Charles Street, Unit 2, in Milton, Ontario.

 

On Brian McNulty’s collection letter dated March 10, 2015, reproduced above, one can, however, find an address; 1450 Meyerside Drive, 2nd Floor, in Mississauga which, appears as the footer on this collection letter.  This address just happens to be the registered head office for Credit Bureau of Canada Collections (CBCC), one of the largest collection agencies operating in Canada.

The address that appears as the footer at the bottom of Brian McNulty's collection letter sent to a person allegedly owing monies to Rogers Communications is 1450 Meyerside Drive, 2nd Floor, Mississauga, Ontario, the registered head office for Credit Bureau of Canada (CBCC) , one of the largest collection agencies in Canada.

The address that appears as the footer at the bottom of Brian McNulty’s collection letter sent to a person allegedly owing monies to Rogers Communications is 1450 Meyerside Drive, 2nd Floor, Mississauga, Ontario, the registered head office for Credit Bureau of Canada (CBCC) , one of the largest collection agencies in Canada.

 

Actual location for lawyer Brian McNulty’s law office in Milton, Ontario

Yesterday I had lunch with a bankruptcy trustee in Mississauga, Ontario, and on my drive back to Kitchener I took a one kilometer detour in Milton for 15 minutes to take a photograph of 36 Charles Street, Unit 2. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that this building is a 2-storey house and nowhere–at least from the street–can one find any signage indicating that the office for a lawyer is located in this building which appears to be a residence.

 

This is a photograph of 36 Charles Street in Milton, Ontario, where, according to the Lawyer and Paralegal Directory, Brian McNulty's law office--in Unit 2 of this building--is located.

This is a photograph of 36 Charles Street in Milton, Ontario, where, according to the Law Society of Upper Canada’s Lawyer and Paralegal Directory, Brian McNulty’s law office–in Unit 2 of this building–is located.

 

Rogers Communications is a very large corporation. They own the Toronto Blue Jays.  Not that long ago Rogers spent more than $5 billion to acquire most of the rights to broadcast National Hockey League games. It would appear that Rogers Communications is now trying to cut some costs in some areas such as collecting unpaid accounts.  If they pare their expenses on collecting unpaid accounts then maybe they could go out and acquire some first-rate starting pitching which the Blue Jays desperately need.

 

Omission of lawyer’s registered law office address on collection letter

As a consumer advocate, I am disturbed by the fact that Brian McNulty, Barrister & Solicitor, would send a demand letter to a consumer (1) on his letterhead, and (2) which he signed, in circumstances where his office address–the one he has on file with the Law Society of Upper Canada–does not appear anywhere on the letter.  What would happen if a consumer desperately wanted to reach Mr. McNulty to discuss their account and they, for some reason, could not find Mr. McNulty’s address on the internet?  We sometimes forget that a signficant percentage of adults–particularly low-income individuals, senior citizens, and recent immigrants–simply do not use the internet!

Is it asking too much for lawyers collecting monies from consumers to include on their collection letters the address for their law office–the one that they give to a provincial law society as the “registered” address for their law firm?

 

How many collection letters does lawyer Brian McNulty send to Canadians?

You, like me, might find it a stretch to believe that Rogers Communications, one of the largest creditors in the country, hired Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, to send out one collection letter from a lawyer in 2015.  In the absence of any information to the contrary, it would be reasonable to assume, with some degree of confidence, that Brian McNulty–has in the past, or is currently–sending out a significant number of collection letters to consumers allegedly owing monies to Rogers Communications.

You, like me, might also find it odd that one of the largest collection agencies in Canada would hire a lawyer working from a house to send out collection letters on behalf of one, or potentally more, clients because of the relatively small size of the premises from where the lawyer worked from.  As a practical matter, how many collection letters could be physically produced in a month at Unit 2, 36 Charles Street in Milton, Ontario?  How many staff does Brian McNulty have working at this location?

With the assistance of the public, and potentially current or former employees at his firm or at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, we should be able to get a better picture of how many collection letters lawyer Brian McNulty is physically generating each month from his law office located in a house in Milton, Ontario.  If you have any knowledge regarding the actual production of Brian McNulty’s collection letters then I would invite you to call me toll free at 1 (866) 996-9941 or at (519) 827-5513, or to send me an e-mail at mark@comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca

 

Request for copies of collection letters sent by lawyer Brian McNulty

I would invite anyone who has recieved a letter from lawyer Brian McNulty demanding payment of an account for Rogers Communications–or any other creditor–to contact me by calling me toll free at 1 (866) 996-9941 or at (519) 827-5513, or via e-mail, at mark@comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca

If you work for an organization that routinely sees collection letters I would invite you to provide me with a redacted copy of any collection letters from lawyer Brian McNulty which I can post on www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca.  These letters should black out any information that would (1) identify the name or address of the consumer, or (2) any details that would identify a consumer’s specifc account.

You can learn more details regarding this unfolding story by visiting a webpage dedicated to Brian McNulty on www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca.  Here is the link to this webpage:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/mcnulty–brian-demand-letters.html

I have also created a dedicated webpage for Credit Bureau of Canada Collections (CBCC) on www.comprehensivedebtsolutons.ca.  Here is the link to this webpage.

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/credit-bureau-of-canada-collections.html

 

Who were the people who actually thought up this collection letter?

Having worked as a collection lawyer for 12 years I have some idea as to how large collection agencies operate, and the various approvals that might be required before a collection letter can be sent out on behalf of a major creditor.  I imagine that someone at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections looked at the letter reproduced above, before it was sent out, even if it were to simply make sure the address and phone numbers were accurate.  I have no idea whether or not anyone at Rogers Communications saw this letter or approved it in advance. I have to assume that Brian McNulty saw this collection letter dated March 10, 2015, before it went out because his signature, or a copy of his signature, appears at the bottom of the collection letter.

While I am curious who saw this letter before it was sent out, I am really curious about who was the person who actually came up with the idea of sending out a collection letter from a lawyer where the lawyer’s address does not appear anywhere on the letter.

In a previous life I worked as a collection lawyer for four of the ten largest collection agencies in Canada.  During that period, from time to time, I might have seen a collection idea that I did not find a particularly good idea.  But this collection letter is different.  I have never seen a dumber collection letter in my entire life–and I am talking about a career in the collection industry spanning 22 years!

 

Collection tactics authorized by Rogers Communications

What has been the role of senior management at Rogers Communications responsible for third party collection agencies in connection with the Brian McNulty collection letter reproduced above used to collect monies allegedly owing to Rogers?  Were they aware that:

1.       a lawyer working from a house in Milton, Ontario, was sending out collection letters on its behalf, or

2.       that the collection letters used by Brian McNulty contained a footer–the address for Credit Bureau of Canada Collections–and that nowhere on this collection letter did Mr. McNulty’s law office address appear

 

Will Rogers Communications take any action in response to this blog Post now that Brian McNulty’s collection notices sent on behalf of Rogers is a topic of public discussion on  social media?

 

Questions about the judgment exercised by senior management at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections

What does this incident tell us about the judgment, or lack thereof, of senior management at the Credit Bureau of Canada Collections?

Was John Kim, the Executive Vice-President at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, aware of all the details involving Brian McNulty collection letters and did he personally approve these letters?

John Kim is an individual who plays a leadership role in the creditor community.  He is a member of the board of directors of the Credit Association of Greater Toronto (CAGT), an industry association representing the interests of creditors.  Mr. Kim plays a key role in that organization serving as the First Vice-President, the second highest position on the board of directors, second only to the President, Brian Cherry, who is the President of A-1 Credit Recovery & Collection Services Inc.

 

This excerpt from the Credit Association of Greater Toronto's list of board members reveals that John Kim is, the Executive Vice-President, and Principal at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections is also the 1st Vice President of the Credit Association of Greater Toronto.

This screenshot from the Credit Association of Greater Toronto’s website, www.cagt.ca, contains the contact informaiton for its board members including that of John Kim, the Executive Vice-President, and Principal at Credit Bureau of Canada Collections, who serves as the 1st Vice President of the Credit Association of Greater Toronto.

 

 

Acknowledgement

I could not have written today’s blog Post if it had not been for a person who works in an office where they have access to copies of collection letters sent to consumers.  They were very generous in terms of providing me with redacted versions of collection notices sitting in that firm’s files–in which any confidential information regarding (1) the consumer’s identity or (2) the consumer’s account information were blacked out.

 

Call for Listening Posts

The success of the Mark Silverthorn Blog is due in large part to people in both the public and private sector–employees, or former employees, of collection agencies, in-house collection departments at major creditors, collection law firms, debt buyers, credit counselling agencies, debt settlement firms, and bankruptcy trustees.  These individuals, who have an ear to the ground, have the opportunity to act as “listening posts”, who from time to time, might want to contact me to share with me what is happening in their industry, at their particular employer, or even a former employer.

At some point you might reach a decision, for whatever reason, that the public ought to be aware of a particualr matter.  The information or potentially, the documents you share with me, might be crucial in helping vulnerable Canadians experiencing major challenges dealing with unsecured consumer debt.  I would invite you to contact me, on a confidential basis, to share your story.

 

I am very fortunate to have some incredible contacts in the collection industry..

I am very fortunate to have some incredible contacts in the collection industry..

 

 

From time to time individuals will provide me with confidential information about an entity's activites on a confidential basis.  My number one priority is to protect the anonymity of any of my sources.

From time to time individuals will provide me with confidential information about an entity’s activities on a confidential basis. My number one priority is to protect the anonymity of any of my sources.

 

I would invite anyone reading the Mark Silverthorn Blog to consider becoming a listening post and potentially someone who might provide me with tips for stories which the public ought to know about.

For more information about collection lawyer Brian McNulty and Credti Bureau of Canada Collections you are invited to visit my firm’s website at www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Limitation periods are debtors’ secret weapon

Our encyclopedic knowledge of the collection industry and our extensive network of contacts with access to classifed information is a tremendous asset in helping consumers deal with their consumer debt issues.

Our encyclopedic knowledge of the collection industry and our extensive network of contacts with access to classifed information is a tremendous asset in helping consumers deal with their consumer debt issues.  Photo courtesy of Emilie van Gent.

 

The greatest single weapon available to those Canadians struggling with unsecured consumer debt such as credit card debt can be a limitation period.  I refer to this weapon as a secret weapon because one could make the case that there is a conspiracy to deny not only the existence of limitation periods but also their tremendous value to a consumer drowning in debt.

People employed full-time in Canada selling goods and services to Canadian consumers facing major challenges with unsecured consumer debt might have to close their doors if they routinely and aggressively promoted the virtues of taking advantage of limitation periods.

Each province and territory in Canada has a limitation period–between two years and six years depending upon the province.  A creditor who fails to commence a lawsuit against a consumer before the expiry of the limitation period in the province where the consumer lives might encounter serious problems recovering a nickel from a consumer on an unpaid account.

A consumer who can take full advantage of a limitation period might be able to avoid paying a penny to one or more unsecured creditors, and in the process, they might be able to save thousands, and in some cases, tens of thousands of dollars.  Alternatively, once a limitation period were to expire in a province with a short limitation period– 2 years in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and New Brunswick, and 3 years in Quebec–a creditor might be much more motivated to agree to accept a one-time payment as settlement in full of an unpaid account for somewhere between 10 and 50 cents on the dollar.

To learn more about taking advantage of limitation periods, you can read a comprehensive article on the issue titled “How Can a Canadian Take Advantage of a Limitation Period to Eliminate Their Debt?” on www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca

Here is the link where you can read this article:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/limitation-periods.html

 

On The Mark Silverthorn Blog our goal is to assist you with a host of inside information in order to help you obtain the best possible result given your particular debt situation.

On The Mark Silverthorn Blog our goal is to assist you obtain the best possible result given your particular debt situation.  Photo courtesy of Emilie van Gent.

 

 

TCR largest collection agency in Canada

 

It’s Official!  At Comprehensive Debt Solutions, we are naming Total Credit Recovery Ltd. the largest collection agency operating in Canada.  This announcement is based upon the fact that our sources indicate that the Toronto-based Total Credit Recovery Ltd. employs more collectors making collection calls to Canadians, excluding purchased debt, than any other collection agency–by a signficant margin.

 

Comparative sizes of collection agencies based upon number of collectors

In our view, the only practical yardstick for measuring the comparative size of collection agencies in Canada is the number of collectors they employ making third party collection calls to Canadian residents.  Since many of the largest collection agencies operating in Canada are privately-owned there is no financial information available to shed light on the collection agency’s size.  While the number of collectors that a collection agency employs is not a precise yardstick for measuring the comparative size of collection agencies, it is the best method for measuring the size of collection agencies.

 

23 collection agencies in Canada employ more than 50 collectors

Our research indicates that 23 collection agencies in Canada employ more than 50 collectors making third party collection calls to Canadian residents.  Comprehensive Debt Solutions has a webpage titled “Largest Collection Agencies Operating in Canada” dedicated to these 23 collection agencies and lists the addresses for each of the company’s locations, as well as their telephone and fax numbers and website addresses. Here is the link for this webpage:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/largest-collection-agencies-in-canada.html

 

Photographs of locations for the largest 23 collection agencies operating in Canada

We are also in the process of posting photographs of each and every building where the largest 23 collection agencies in Canada operate from.  I recently posted a Youtube video asking for the public’s help in obtaining phtotographs of the buildings in Canada where these collection agencies operate from.

 

I recently shot a 60-second Youtube video requesting the public’s help in obtaining photographs of buildings where the largest collection agencies in Canada operate from.  Video footage courtesy of Emilie van Gent.

 

Our initiatives to provide Canadians with more information about the collection industry 

At the present time Comprehensive Debt Solutions Inc. is involved in a number of initiatives to provide consumers with more information about the collection industry as well as the “debt help” industry–those entities that hold themselves out as assisting consumers with debt problems.

Earlier this year we announced that we have compiled a comprehensive list of collectors in Ontario which we call our Ontario Collector Database.  You can learn more about the Ontario Collector Database at the following link:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/canadian-collector-database.html

Earlier this year we published our complimentary online Ontario Debt Collection Industry Directory, a list of every collection agency, debt settlement firm, and credit counselling agency with offices in Ontario.  You can view the Ontario Debt Collection Industry Directory at the following webpage:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/ontario-debt-collection-directory.html

We recently began compiling information in connection with the Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry.

For more information about the Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry you can visit the following webpage:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/who-s-who-of-the-canadian-collection-industry.html

 

Our firm has an extensive network of contacts to draw on for our sources of information.

Our firm has an extensive network of contacts to draw on for our sources of information.

Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry

 

My firm, Comprehensive Debt Solutions Inc. is pleased to announce that it is currently working on publishing a Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry.

When it is completed this list will include the names of several hundred individuals from the following categories:

 

bankruptcy trustees

bloggers

collection agencies

collection law firms

credit counselling firms

debt buyers

debt consultants

debt settlement firms

industry associations

industry regulators

in-house collection departments at major creditors

major creditors

suppliers to the collection industry

websites

 

For more information about the Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry you are welcome to visit the following link:

http://www.comprehensivedebtsolutions.ca/who-s-who-of-the-canadian-collection-industry.html

You can nominate a person for inclusion in the Who’s Who of the Canadian Collection Industry by completing a brief online form on this webpage and submitting it online.

PIAC report author downplays collection agency misconduct

 

On Tuesday, March 30, 2015, CTV’s Canada AM aired an interview with Jonathan Bishop, the author of a new report on the Canadian collection industry.  The report was prepared for the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), an Ottawa-based  non-profit organization which promotes the interests of consumers.  The report contains nine recommendations for improving the debt collection industry in Canada.

 

You can watch the Canada AM interview with Jonathan Bishop, author of PIAC’s report on the Canadian collection industr, on the following link:

http://canadaam.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=578764

 

I found one statement that Jonathan Bishop, the report’s author, made during this Canada AM interview to be quite disturbing in which he downplayed the level of misconduct by collection agencies in this country.

When the interviewer on Canada AM asked how collection agencies, in general, were conducting themselves, Mr. Bishop gave the following answer:

This is a very small number of consumers that are affected by the collection agencies’ tactics of this nature.  For the most part collection agencies do their job in a very courteous manner.  However, it only takes a few small … a few bad apples to spoil the bunch.

I take issue with this statement made by Mr. Bishop during this recent interview on Canada AM.  This comment by Mr. Bishop understates the level of illegal and socially unacceptable behavior by collection agencies in this country today.

Why did the Public Industry Advocacy Centre commit time and resources to the preparation of a 96-page report on the Canadian collection industry, and make nine recommendations for improving the industry, when according to the report’s author a “very small number of consumers” are affected by collection agency misconduct?

The PIAC report contains nine recommendations, one of which, is that all phone calls between collection agencies and debtors be recorded.  You can read this 96-page report, titled “All Along The Watch Tower:  A Review of the Canadian Consumer Debt Collection Industry” by visiting www.piac.ca, the website for the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC).

You can also read my response to the PIAC report on the Canadian collection industry by reading my blog Post on The Mark Silverthorn Blog on March 30, 2015, titled “Report on the Canadian Collection Industry Misses the Mark”.